In January last year I wrote a blog post sharing my thoughts on three things to look for in UK volunteering in 2017. They were:

  1. The review of the flagship National Citizens Service (NCS) scheme
  2. A predicted boom in online volunteering
  3. The Westminster government review into full-time social action (aka volunteering)

So, what happened?

NCS review

The review, conducted by the Public Accounts Committee (PAC), reported in March 2017 and did not make comfortable reading. As Civil Society reported:

“An influential committee of MPs has published a highly critical report into the National Citizen Service, and its chair has called on government to carry out a fundamental review before spending any money on the programme.”

The full PAC report can be accessed here. Whilst they acknowledge progress since NCS started in 2011, the committee found that:

  • Work is required if National Citizen Service is to become a sustainable investment in young people.
  • The programme “may no longer be justifiable” if it is unable to meet its targets for increasing the number of participants, or achieve its long-term societal aims – both at a cheaper cost per head – noting that the NCS Trust and DCMS cannot justify the “seemingly high” cost per participant.
  • The Department for Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS), which has overall responsibility for NCS, lacks the data to measure long-term outcomes of the programme or understand what works.
  • The NCS Trust paid providers some £10 million in 2016 for places that were not filled and expresses disappointment at the Trust’s “relaxed attitude about the non-recovery of these funds”.
  • There were concerns about the transparency and governance of the Trust, and finds it is “unclear” whether the Trust has the skills and experience necessary to oversee growth of the NCS programme.

Michael Lynas, Chief Executive of the NCS Trust was reported in Civil Society as saying:

“We are considering all the recommendations in this report carefully and will work closely with the Department for Culture, Media and Sport and our other partners to deliver them and make NCS a normal part of growing up for young people in our country.”

Despite all this NCS continues apace and received Royal Charter status during the year. I wonder if any other body receiving over £1billion of public money would get away as lightly as NCS seems to have done last year?

(NB – in the interests of fairness it should be noted that coverage of a recent report into the value for money of NCS has suggested the scheme is moving in a positive direction).

A boom in online volunteering?

Towards the end for 2016, Vicki Sellick, Director of Nesta’s innovation lab, wrote:

”My prediction is that 2017 might just be the year of micro-volunteering and data donation, with cheap technologies allowing everyone to volunteer from home for short and sweet periods of time, no matter how much time they have to give.”

Well, I have seen no evidence that online and microvolunteering has boomed this year. Personally, I’ve come across just as many volunteer managers in 2017 who face significant challenges in developing their volunteering offers to fit microvolunteering models or embrace online technologies.

As long as organisations continue to underinvest in volunteer engagement this will continue. Leaders of volunteers are largely enthusiastic about utilising technology to innovate and develop the work of volunteers. The problem is they consistently come up against boards and senior managers who don’t understand the modern realities of volunteering and fail to resource this essential work adequately. That, coupled with many organisations practising risk avoidance as they live in fear of technologies they don’t understand, is causing much frustration amongst leaders of volunteers.

All that said, I’d be happy to stand corrected if independent data can be produced to show that online volunteering has boomed in 2017. I think I’ll be waiting for a while though as our most reliable volunteer data, The Community Life Survey, changed methodology recently and so is no longer trackable with data produced since 2001. That and it never asked specifically about online volunteering anyway!

Review into full-time social action

This review, much touted at the start of 2017, finally got underway in September after delays resulting from the Prime Minister calling June’s snap general election.

The call for evidence closed on 13 October and the review panel are analysing the feedback they received. I would anticipate a final report sometime in early 2018.

Until then, I commend to you NCVO’s thoughtful responseto the review’s call for evidence. This sums up many of my own thoughts about the review and I wait with interest to see what recommendations will result from the panels work.

So, there you have it. Three interesting issues during 2017 and what actually happened (or didn’t). What were your volunteering highlights of 2017 and what are you looking forward to in 2018? Share your thoughts below.

2 thoughts on “Three things I said to look for in 2017 and what happened

  1. I closely follow virtual volunteering trends and news, including online microvolunteering – and, indeed, I’ve seen nothing to indicate this is happening anymore than it happened even five years ago. Sure, it’s happening. Absolutely, it’s widespread – though not nearly as widespread in the UK as it is in the USA or Spain or many countries in Eastern Europe. But this dramatic increase Vicki Sellick talks about? Nope. I suspect Ms. Sellick doesn’t know how widespread the practice already is. The reason more nonprofits and charities aren’t creating microvolunteering opportunities – a subset of virtual volunteering where volunteers provide service for just a few minutes at a time – is because it’s just not an efficient way to meet the mission of many organizations. Why involve 50 online volunteers to do pieces of an assignment, which takes a great deal more work by whomever is supervising them – than to just get one great online volunteer who is much easier to supervise and wants an assignment that shows real impact? Microvolunteering is great, but just like group volunteering, it’s just not something most charities and nonprofits really need.


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